• TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

    Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an une...

    published: 27 Dec 2015
  • Scientists fear deep-sea mining

    Scientists fear that even before one of the last frontiers of exploration, the ocean deep, has been properly studied it will already have been exploited by commercial deep-sea mining looking for rare euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.

    published: 06 Sep 2016
  • Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

    Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist

    published: 25 Apr 2017
  • Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

    Nautilus Animated Industrial that shows a sterilized version of the Deep Sea mining process.

    published: 01 Oct 2011
  • How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

    Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals has reached an agreement with the government of Papua New Guinea to begin mining an area of seabed believed to be rich in gold and copper ores, according to the BBC. Under the terms of the agreement, Papua New Guinea will contribute $120 million to the operation and receive a 15 percent share in the mine. Environmentalists say the mine will devastate the area and cause long-lasting damage to the environment. The BBC reports that "the mine will target an area of hydrothermal vents where superheated, highly acidic water emerges from the seabed, where it encounters far colder and more alkaline seawater, forcing it to deposit high concentrations of minerals." The report continues: The result is that the seabed is formed of ores that are far ric...

    published: 07 Jun 2014
  • World's Deepest Mine - Gold Alchemy

    South Africa's TauTona mine, real life alchemy, and Halicephalobus Mephisto. Footage from the 2012 documentary, "Down to the Earth's Core". We have travelled into space and looked deep into the universe's depths, but the world beneath our feet remains unexplored and unseen. Now, that's about to change. For the first time in one epic unbroken shot, we embark on an impossible mission - using spectacular computer generated imagery to smash through three thousand miles of solid rock, and venture from our world into the underworld and on to the core of the Earth itself. It's a journey fraught with danger. One thousand feet down we find ourselves inside one of the planet's most volatile places - the San Andreas Fault. Caught between two huge rock slabs, we watch as stress builds and then ...

    published: 01 Mar 2013
  • Stranded Deep Gameplay | SEA MINES EASTER EGG!! | PART 34 (HD 60FPS)

    Yes, we finally find one of the best hidden easter eggs, a sea mine! ►Merch: http://aaronsaywhat.spreadshirt.com/ ►Instagram: aaronhunter3 ►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Aaronsaywhat/638366112958755 ►Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=aaronsaywhat ►Want to join a network like me? Apply here; http://www.freedom.tm/via/AaronSayWhat ►Song Used - Sunrise By Creesh ~Like | Comment | Share | Subscribe~

    published: 27 Feb 2015
  • ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

    Description

    published: 06 Apr 2015
  • Song of the Deep Ep 9: Moving Deep-Sea Mines

    In this episode, we push forward into this bizarre clockwork city and discover a couple new mechanics and tools for use with our sub! --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Thank you so much Krimson Studios for the intro, be sure and check him out! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQN3dNrzy9q0ujEj7149Xfg ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Hit me up on social networking as well: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ToAsgaard/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ToAsgaard Steam: To Asgaard Discord: ToAsgaard#1186

    published: 21 Dec 2016
  • Bizarre Underwater Discoveries

    From amazing art to a mysterious train, these are 13 of the most bizarre underwater discoveries. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 10. The Cancun Underwater Museum has over 500 underwater sculptures dedicated to the Art of Conservation. The unique attraction offers divers a spectacular view of the statues that can be seen from a glass bottom boat. The museum began its venture in Cancun in 2009 and was completed in 2013. Each figure was made from a PH neutral cement, coral, seaweed and algae. The reason for this is to help benefit and protect coral reefs. Coral reefs can be created from sunken ships that fall to the bottom of the ocean floor. Creating statues are used to help save the ocean by creating a new way to grow coral reefs. 9. MS Zenobia was a Swedish ferry boat t...

    published: 29 Mar 2016
  • Diving into the Philippines' dangerous, underwater mines

    Filipino divers disappear into water as opaque as chocolate milk as they blindly dig in search of gold trapped in muddy sediment. It's risky business: As miners go deeper, underwater tunnels could collapse or the compressor that provides air may fail. Hari Sreenivasan reports on a dangerous venture undertaken by adults and kids.

    published: 28 Jan 2014
  • Mega Underwater Excavation - Super Giant Dredgers ( Dredging Technology)

    Dredging is an excavation activity or operation usually carried out at least partly underwater, in shallow seas or fresh water areas with the purpose of gath. Dredging is an excavation activity or operation usually carried out at least partly underwater, in shallow seas or fresh water areas with the purpose of gath. ABP's Port of Southampton has now completed a £40M dredge programme which will allow the world's largest ships to access the Southampton Container Terminal w. Visuals Studio Brazil 2012 Director - Producer: Ernst Daniel Nijboer Rio de Janeiro Brazil infovisuals@gmail.com Sur Final Version 20120618 mov.

    published: 28 Nov 2014
  • 19 DEEPEST Places On Earth

    From a superdeep borehole to diamond mines to spaces between techtonic plates these are the 19 DEEPEST Places Ever on Earth. This Volcano commonly called the Three-Peaks Crater, because of its unpronounceable icelandic name is the only volcano on Earth that you can actually climb down into. The 700 feet (200 meter) deep volcano cavern could easily fit two Statues of Liberty Stacked on top of each other inside. If you’re interested in visiting Three-Peaks but are worried about becoming human barbecue, don’t worry - the volcano has been dormant for more than 4000 years and doesn’t look like it will be erupting anytime soon. This miles wide mine holds the record for one of the biggest open excavation mines in the world. The massive mine was originally founded by Mormon settlers in Utah ...

    published: 03 Jun 2016
  • The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific

    The ocean has a wealth of resources. From food, to travel, to pharmaceutical needs, and to energy, the ocean has always provided for mankind. And now, mankind is turning to the ocean for minerals and metals needed for the technology we use in our everyday lives. An exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers. Read more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/underwater-mining-pacific-ocean

    published: 14 Dec 2016
  • DEEP SEA MINING | Ocean Mining

    Try to balance the struggles of making a profit while only making a minimal impact on the environment. https://crystalline-green-ltd.itch.io/ocean-mining Don't forget to like, comment and subscribe. Twitter: https://twitter.com/yeager11981 Wanna play with me? Steam: Yeagerbr Xbox Gamertag: Yeagerbr 3DS Friend code: 3196-4238-0461

    published: 07 Jun 2017
  • Experimental Seabed Mining - Coming to a Coastline Near YOU!

    Donate: http://actnowpng.org/donate Share on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1l93esG Share on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1l93kk6 Papua New Guinea has already suffered some of the worlds worst mining disasters . Foreign companies have polluted our rivers, destroyed communities and caused a violent civil war. Now Nautilus Minerals wants to dig up the seafloor in a new experimental mining operation. But, as the government has already acknowledged, communities all across PNG are saying they do not want to be part of this experiment. But this issue is of much wider significance than just Solwara 1 and Papua New Guinea. There is already exploration for similar mines all across the Pacific region and in the Indian ocean. Numerous countries have sanctioned the exploration without understanding the full...

    published: 31 Oct 2013
TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

TechKnow - Deep sea gold rush

  • Order:
  • Duration: 23:43
  • Updated: 27 Dec 2015
  • views: 15218
videos
Oceans cover 70 percent of the earth's surface, but only a fraction of the undersea world has been explored. On this episode of TechKnow, Phil Torres joins a team of scientists on a special expedition to explore and uncover the mysteries at the bottom of the ocean floor. "What we are doing is similar to astronauts and planetary scientists just trying to study life on another planet," says Beth Orcutt, a senior research scientist. The journey begins in Costa Rica aboard the R/V Atlantis, a research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. From there, Phil gets the chance to take a dive with Alvin, a deep-water submersible capable of taking explorers down to 6,000 metres (20,000 feet) under the sea. Commissioned in 1964, Alvin has a celebrated history, locating an unexploded hydrogen bomb off the coast of Spain and exploring the famous RMS Titanic in the 1980s. Alvin and its first female pilot, Cindy Van Dover, were the first to discover hydrothermal vents, which are underwater springs where plumes of black smoke and water pour out from underneath the earth's crust. The vents were inhabited by previously unknown organisms that thrived in the absence of sunlight. After 40 years of exploration, Alvin got a high-tech upgrade. The storied submersible is now outfitted with high-resolution cameras to provide a 245-degree viewing field and a robotic arm that scientists can use to pull samples of rock and ocean life to then study back on land. But scientists are not the only ones interested in the ocean. These days the new gold rush is not in the hills, it is in the deep sea. For thousands of years miners have been exploiting the earth in search of precious metals. As resources on dry land are depleted, now the search for new sources of metals and minerals is heading underwater. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's national ocean service estimates that there is more than $150tn in gold waiting to be mined from the floor of the world's oceans. "The industry is moving very, very fast. They have far more financial resources than the scientific community," says Cindy Van Dover, Alvin's first female pilot and Duke University Oceanography Professor. Seabed mining is still in the planning stages, but Nautilus Minerals, a Canadian mining company, says it has the technology and the contracts in place with the island nation of Papua New Guinea to start mining in its waters in about two years. What is the future of seabed mining? And what are the consequences of seabed mining for the marine ecosystems? Can science and industry co-exist and work together on viable and sustainable solutions? - Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check out our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/
https://wn.com/Techknow_Deep_Sea_Gold_Rush
Scientists fear deep-sea mining

Scientists fear deep-sea mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:01
  • Updated: 06 Sep 2016
  • views: 2919
videos
Scientists fear that even before one of the last frontiers of exploration, the ocean deep, has been properly studied it will already have been exploited by commercial deep-sea mining looking for rare euronews knowledge brings you a fresh mix of the world's most interesting know-hows, directly from space and sci-tech experts. Subscribe for your dose of space and sci-tech: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=euronewsknowledge Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.
https://wn.com/Scientists_Fear_Deep_Sea_Mining
Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

Deep-sea mining could transform the globe

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:33
  • Updated: 25 Apr 2017
  • views: 22495
videos
Gold alone found on the sea floor is estimated to be worth $150 trn. But the cost to the planet of extracting it could be severe. Check out Economist Films: http://films.economist.com/ Check out The Economist’s full video catalogue: http://econ.st/20IehQk Like The Economist on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheEconomist/ Follow The Economist on Twitter: https://twitter.com/theeconomist Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theeconomist/ Follow us on LINE: http://econ.st/1WXkOo6 Follow us on Medium: https://medium.com/@the_economist
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_Could_Transform_The_Globe
Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

Nautilus Animated Industrial.mp4

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:16
  • Updated: 01 Oct 2011
  • views: 22555
videos
Nautilus Animated Industrial that shows a sterilized version of the Deep Sea mining process.
https://wn.com/Nautilus_Animated_Industrial.Mp4
How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

How a Canadian company will mine the sea bed near Papua New Guinea

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:12
  • Updated: 07 Jun 2014
  • views: 21229
videos
Canadian mining company Nautilus Minerals has reached an agreement with the government of Papua New Guinea to begin mining an area of seabed believed to be rich in gold and copper ores, according to the BBC. Under the terms of the agreement, Papua New Guinea will contribute $120 million to the operation and receive a 15 percent share in the mine. Environmentalists say the mine will devastate the area and cause long-lasting damage to the environment. The BBC reports that "the mine will target an area of hydrothermal vents where superheated, highly acidic water emerges from the seabed, where it encounters far colder and more alkaline seawater, forcing it to deposit high concentrations of minerals." The report continues: The result is that the seabed is formed of ores that are far richer in gold and copper than ores found on land. Mike Johnston, chief executive of Nautilus Minerals told the BBC "that a temperature probe left in place for 18 months was found to have 'high grade copper all over it'." Nautilus announced in April that it had completed its bulk cutter, the first component of its Seafloor Production Tools system, which will be used to mine the seabed. Nautilus also approximately 500,000 square kilometres of "highly prospective exploration acreage" in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Fiji, Vanuatu and Tonga, as well as in international waters in the eastern Pacific, the company said in a press release.
https://wn.com/How_A_Canadian_Company_Will_Mine_The_Sea_Bed_Near_Papua_New_Guinea
World's Deepest Mine - Gold Alchemy

World's Deepest Mine - Gold Alchemy

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:51
  • Updated: 01 Mar 2013
  • views: 320520
videos
South Africa's TauTona mine, real life alchemy, and Halicephalobus Mephisto. Footage from the 2012 documentary, "Down to the Earth's Core". We have travelled into space and looked deep into the universe's depths, but the world beneath our feet remains unexplored and unseen. Now, that's about to change. For the first time in one epic unbroken shot, we embark on an impossible mission - using spectacular computer generated imagery to smash through three thousand miles of solid rock, and venture from our world into the underworld and on to the core of the Earth itself. It's a journey fraught with danger. One thousand feet down we find ourselves inside one of the planet's most volatile places - the San Andreas Fault. Caught between two huge rock slabs, we watch as stress builds and then releases. It unleashes an earthquake and blasts us on towards rivers of molten rock, explosive volcanoes, tears in the Earth's crust and giant tornadoes of liquid metal. But for every danger, there are wonders beyond imagination. Four hundred feet below the surface, a three hundred million year old fossilized forest, with every leaf and every piece of bark perfectly preserved. At one thousand feet down we enter a cave of giant crystals, glistening in deadly 122 degree heat. More than two miles underground we find buried treasure - gold and gems. Deeper still there are valuable resources - salt, oil, coal and iron. And over one hundred miles down we see the sparkling beauty of diamonds. As we descend we piece together our planet's extraordinary story. We rewind time to discover how prehistoric forests became modern-day fuel. 1700 feet down a layer of rock reveals the extraordinary story of the dinosaurs' cataclysmic death. We watch stalactites form and gold grow before our eyes. The deeper we travel into the underworld the more we understand our world above the surface. A bigger picture takes shape - a cycle of destruction and creation, driven by the core that sustains our dynamic planet and makes the Earth the only planet with life in a seemingly lifeless universe. Until, finally, three thousand miles down, we reach the core. Inside it lie the secrets of life as we know it - the magnetic force field that protects life on Earth from the sun's deadly rays, the ancient heat source that keeps our planet alive. Down to the Earth's Core brings the latest science together with breathtaking computer generated imagery. The result is an unmissable journey into an extraordinary world - full of dangers, wonders and secrets. And it's all down there, beneath our feet, right now waiting to be discovered.
https://wn.com/World's_Deepest_Mine_Gold_Alchemy
Stranded Deep Gameplay | SEA MINES EASTER EGG!! | PART 34 (HD 60FPS)

Stranded Deep Gameplay | SEA MINES EASTER EGG!! | PART 34 (HD 60FPS)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 29:53
  • Updated: 27 Feb 2015
  • views: 18212
videos
Yes, we finally find one of the best hidden easter eggs, a sea mine! ►Merch: http://aaronsaywhat.spreadshirt.com/ ►Instagram: aaronhunter3 ►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Aaronsaywhat/638366112958755 ►Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=aaronsaywhat ►Want to join a network like me? Apply here; http://www.freedom.tm/via/AaronSayWhat ►Song Used - Sunrise By Creesh ~Like | Comment | Share | Subscribe~
https://wn.com/Stranded_Deep_Gameplay_|_Sea_Mines_Easter_Egg_|_Part_34_(Hd_60Fps)
ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

ENS351 Deep Sea Mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:06
  • Updated: 06 Apr 2015
  • views: 3405
videos https://wn.com/Ens351_Deep_Sea_Mining
Song of the Deep Ep 9: Moving Deep-Sea Mines

Song of the Deep Ep 9: Moving Deep-Sea Mines

  • Order:
  • Duration: 23:20
  • Updated: 21 Dec 2016
  • views: 32
videos
In this episode, we push forward into this bizarre clockwork city and discover a couple new mechanics and tools for use with our sub! --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Thank you so much Krimson Studios for the intro, be sure and check him out! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQN3dNrzy9q0ujEj7149Xfg ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Hit me up on social networking as well: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ToAsgaard/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/ToAsgaard Steam: To Asgaard Discord: ToAsgaard#1186
https://wn.com/Song_Of_The_Deep_Ep_9_Moving_Deep_Sea_Mines
Bizarre Underwater Discoveries

Bizarre Underwater Discoveries

  • Order:
  • Duration: 6:17
  • Updated: 29 Mar 2016
  • views: 5114462
videos
From amazing art to a mysterious train, these are 13 of the most bizarre underwater discoveries. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 10. The Cancun Underwater Museum has over 500 underwater sculptures dedicated to the Art of Conservation. The unique attraction offers divers a spectacular view of the statues that can be seen from a glass bottom boat. The museum began its venture in Cancun in 2009 and was completed in 2013. Each figure was made from a PH neutral cement, coral, seaweed and algae. The reason for this is to help benefit and protect coral reefs. Coral reefs can be created from sunken ships that fall to the bottom of the ocean floor. Creating statues are used to help save the ocean by creating a new way to grow coral reefs. 9. MS Zenobia was a Swedish ferry boat that sank on her maiden voyage in 1980 near Larnaca, Cyprus. After passing through the Strait of Gibraltar in route to Athens Greece the captain began to notice problems associated with steering. Once they arrived at Larnaca, the problem occurred again and the computerized pumping system was forcing additional water into the adjacent ballast tanks because of a software error. A few days after the ferry sank and sank in Larnaca Bay. Now it is a favorite dive site for visitors in Cyprus. 8. From land, the swimming whole Angelita looks like an average swimming hole. It is located in the Yucatan in Mexico. Divers have to plunge down to nearly 100 feet underwater to see the river. The “Underwater River,” is a cenote that is just an optical illusion produced by a cloud of hydrogen sulfide intermingling with the surrounding saltwater. 7. USS Oriskany is nicknamed the “Mighty O”. Was one of the small amount of Essex-class aircraft carriers finished only after World War II for the United States Navy. The ship was called for the Battle of Oriskany through the Revolutionary War. The aircraft carrier saw years of combat through both the Korean and Viet Nam Wars before the carrier was purposely sunk to become part of the world's largest artificial coral reef. 6. Several miles off New Jersey’s coast there lie an unanticipated site below the ocean’s surface. Two trains were found in 1985 but no one knows for sure how they got there. The most excepted theory behind how the locomotives got there is that in the 1850's the trains were being transported from the place they were built to their new home which was likely a rail yard. Because the locomotives were small, they could have been pushed overboard into the sea. Now the trains give an interesting spot for divers. 5. Yonaguni Monument is located off the coast of the Ryukyu Islands, in Japan. The monument is connected to a large rock mass in the ocean and believe to have been deposited over 20 million years ago. The main monument is a rectangular formation which measures 490 by 130 ft. The rock formation is made out of moderate to very fine sandstones and mudstones. Scientist who have studied the formation have concluded that some of the features could be manmade. One scientist believes that the site could be fragments of the legendary lost continent of Mu. 4. The SS President Coolidge was an ocean liner from the U.S. The large ship saw its nautical days finish after yielding to mines near the large military base on Espiritu Santo. Now the ship is used as a dive site. Divers can see a mostly intact cruise liner and a military ship. They can swim through numerous parts of the ship. There are guns, cannons, Jeeps, a stunning statue of "The Lady", chandeliers, and a mosaic tile fountain. Coral grows around the ocean liner where the divers can view sea creatures such as reef fish, barracuda, sea turtles and moray eels. 3. The Titanic, was the world’s largest cruise ship sank on her maiden voyage on April in 1912. The ship was touted as “unsinkable” and was supposed to be one of the safest ships ever built in history. She collided with an iceberg, and nearly half of the passengers lost their lives due to the inadequate supply of life boats on board. 2. The Lion City is a real life Atlantis located in China. The city was purposely flooded to make way for a build hydroelectric power station in 1959. Unfortunately, the city was forgotten but remains largely intact for being underwater for fifty years. Currently, there are plans in the works for divers because they like to use the metropolis to use as a tourist site. 1. SS Thistlegorm merchant ship that was sunk during World War II in the Red Sea. She set to sell for Alexandria, Egypt when two bombs were dropped on her from above. The bombs struck the stern of the ship, and it quickly sank. The ship and holds everything from vehicles, motorcycles, ammunition and other weaponry. Now the SS Thistlegorm is used as a recreational diving site.
https://wn.com/Bizarre_Underwater_Discoveries
Diving into the Philippines' dangerous, underwater mines

Diving into the Philippines' dangerous, underwater mines

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:21
  • Updated: 28 Jan 2014
  • views: 183480
videos
Filipino divers disappear into water as opaque as chocolate milk as they blindly dig in search of gold trapped in muddy sediment. It's risky business: As miners go deeper, underwater tunnels could collapse or the compressor that provides air may fail. Hari Sreenivasan reports on a dangerous venture undertaken by adults and kids.
https://wn.com/Diving_Into_The_Philippines'_Dangerous,_Underwater_Mines
Mega Underwater Excavation - Super Giant Dredgers ( Dredging Technology)

Mega Underwater Excavation - Super Giant Dredgers ( Dredging Technology)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:43:52
  • Updated: 28 Nov 2014
  • views: 336207
videos
Dredging is an excavation activity or operation usually carried out at least partly underwater, in shallow seas or fresh water areas with the purpose of gath. Dredging is an excavation activity or operation usually carried out at least partly underwater, in shallow seas or fresh water areas with the purpose of gath. ABP's Port of Southampton has now completed a £40M dredge programme which will allow the world's largest ships to access the Southampton Container Terminal w. Visuals Studio Brazil 2012 Director - Producer: Ernst Daniel Nijboer Rio de Janeiro Brazil infovisuals@gmail.com Sur Final Version 20120618 mov.
https://wn.com/Mega_Underwater_Excavation_Super_Giant_Dredgers_(_Dredging_Technology)
19 DEEPEST Places On Earth

19 DEEPEST Places On Earth

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:17
  • Updated: 03 Jun 2016
  • views: 31485
videos
From a superdeep borehole to diamond mines to spaces between techtonic plates these are the 19 DEEPEST Places Ever on Earth. This Volcano commonly called the Three-Peaks Crater, because of its unpronounceable icelandic name is the only volcano on Earth that you can actually climb down into. The 700 feet (200 meter) deep volcano cavern could easily fit two Statues of Liberty Stacked on top of each other inside. If you’re interested in visiting Three-Peaks but are worried about becoming human barbecue, don’t worry - the volcano has been dormant for more than 4000 years and doesn’t look like it will be erupting anytime soon. This miles wide mine holds the record for one of the biggest open excavation mines in the world. The massive mine was originally founded by Mormon settlers in Utah about 100 years ago but is now owned by an international mining company who has greatly increased the size of the mine. The mine is about 3 miles (4.8 kilometers) wide and 2640 feet (804 meters) deep. The Caspian Sea is the largest enclosed body of water on Earth and easily one of the deepest. The bottom of the Caspian is more than 3,300 feet (1,025 meters) below sea level in certain parts. Torca del Cerro del Cuevon is the deepest cave in Spain and one of the deepest in the world. This cave cuts right into the Spanish mountain range called Picos de Europa and is known to be one of the hardest caves to explore. However, the brutally tight vertical descent might be worth it because it is also in these dark tunnels where the local specialty of Cabrales cheese is aged. These two caves in Austria make up one of the deepest cave systems in the world. It’s deep tunnels have been recorded to reach down below the surface of the Earth for at least 5,354 feet. However the bottom of the system is nowhere in sight and explorers continue to push downward with the hope that it could be the world’s deepest cave. The Gouffre Berger cave is at least 3,907 feet (1,141 meters) deep and infamous for being one of the most deadliest places to explore because of its extreme drops. It is also the first place to be explored that is more than 3200 feet (1000 meters) below the surface of the Earth. Six people have died more than half a mile deep into the cave because of how easy it is to get trapped during a sudden flood in the caverns. This cave in Mexico has more than 11.8 miles worth of tunnel systems total vertical depth of more than 8,280 feet (2520 meters). The Chevé is prone to sudden flooding and the deepest parts of the cave system are always submerged in water, making this a difficult dive for any cave delver. Some cavers believe that it may be the deepest cave on Earth and push to explore lower and lower into the cave. This cave in Slovenia is extends down for at least 4982 feet (1518.5 meters) deep. Its the deepest cave in the country and one of the deepest in the world. The cave actually goes even deeper into the Earth than its current recorded depth but cave spelunkers haven’t been able to get down any further yet. TauTona mine in South Africa previously held the world record for the deepest mine on Earth. This massive gold mine goes 2.4 miles (3.9) down into the Earth and is just barely shy of claiming the title of world’s deepest mine.
https://wn.com/19_Deepest_Places_On_Earth
The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific

The Next Frontier in Mining: Deep Sea Exploitation in the Pacific

  • Order:
  • Duration: 7:45
  • Updated: 14 Dec 2016
  • views: 405
videos
The ocean has a wealth of resources. From food, to travel, to pharmaceutical needs, and to energy, the ocean has always provided for mankind. And now, mankind is turning to the ocean for minerals and metals needed for the technology we use in our everyday lives. An exploration into the emerging industry of deep sea mining leads to more questions than answers. Read more: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/underwater-mining-pacific-ocean
https://wn.com/The_Next_Frontier_In_Mining_Deep_Sea_Exploitation_In_The_Pacific
DEEP SEA MINING | Ocean Mining

DEEP SEA MINING | Ocean Mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 16:55
  • Updated: 07 Jun 2017
  • views: 94
videos
Try to balance the struggles of making a profit while only making a minimal impact on the environment. https://crystalline-green-ltd.itch.io/ocean-mining Don't forget to like, comment and subscribe. Twitter: https://twitter.com/yeager11981 Wanna play with me? Steam: Yeagerbr Xbox Gamertag: Yeagerbr 3DS Friend code: 3196-4238-0461
https://wn.com/Deep_Sea_Mining_|_Ocean_Mining
Experimental Seabed Mining - Coming to a Coastline Near YOU!

Experimental Seabed Mining - Coming to a Coastline Near YOU!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:31
  • Updated: 31 Oct 2013
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Donate: http://actnowpng.org/donate Share on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1l93esG Share on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1l93kk6 Papua New Guinea has already suffered some of the worlds worst mining disasters . Foreign companies have polluted our rivers, destroyed communities and caused a violent civil war. Now Nautilus Minerals wants to dig up the seafloor in a new experimental mining operation. But, as the government has already acknowledged, communities all across PNG are saying they do not want to be part of this experiment. But this issue is of much wider significance than just Solwara 1 and Papua New Guinea. There is already exploration for similar mines all across the Pacific region and in the Indian ocean. Numerous countries have sanctioned the exploration without understanding the full potential environmental impacts and how it could impact on local communities. NGOs and communities are calling for a moratorium on this type of mining, like that already in place in Vanuatu, until there are proper studies on the environmental and social costs. The timing of the video is very poignant as the PNG government struggles with the issue of whether to put $118 million of tax payers money into the Solwara 1 mine: money the NGOs say could be better spent on improving health and education facilities for communities in PNG. Governments needs to do the right thing for their people rather than looking after these foreign companies that destroy and impoverish us. Governments must reject seabed mining and invest instead in health, education and agriculture for the long-term benefit of our communities. This animation was lovingly crafted by Ample Earth: http://AmpleEarth.com
https://wn.com/Experimental_Seabed_Mining_Coming_To_A_Coastline_Near_You
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